Tool to Assist with Basic SQL Analysis

I just came back from RMOUG Training Days conference. It was my first time in Colorado (and obviously my first RMOUG training day) and it was really great (I wrote about it in another post).

During my second session (From 4 Minutes to 8 Seconds – about a real SQL tuning case I had quite a few years ago), I mentioned that one thing that I usually do when I see a query and need to analyze it, is to take a piece of paper and draw the tables and relations between them. When I later look at the execution plan and try to understand what Oracle does, it helps a lot if I know the structure of the tables. There is a big difference between queries built like a “star” (a single table in the middle, while the others are joined to it) or a “line” (each table is joined to the next one), or any other structure.

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My First Real GitHub Project

This is a short note just to say I’m happy to have my first GitHub project.

A few months ago I wrote a blog post and a python script (on gist) to analyze the listener log file. A few weeks later I got a message from Adric Norris who asked me to create a proper GitHub project, as with gist, people cannot improve and add code.

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Analyzing the Listener.log

A little bit more than a month ago I spoke at OSWOUG event (and wrote this post about it). In the event, Jared Still talked about free tools for Oracle database. He basically said that there is a lot of stuff out there on the internet, and if you can’t find what you need, then write it and publish. So I couldn’t find what I need, and I wrote it, and now I publish (thanks Jared).

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ODC Appreciation Day – Plan Statistics

If you don’t know that by now, OTN (Oracle Technology Netowrk) has changed its name to ODC (Oracle Developer Community), so OTN Appreciation Day becomes ODC Appreciation Day.

This initiative started by Tim Hall from ORACLE_BASE last year. In this day, every blogger writes something to thank Oracle for. You can read about the concept and “rules” here.

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