GI Timezone

Lately I had a weird problem with one of my customers regarding timezone in the database. They copied a database server from US (eastern time zone) to Europe (GMT) and changed all the OS setting to the new timezone. The application uses “sysdate” to insert data to the database, and they saw that the sysdate returns the wrong time. When I checked that, it seemed that when we used sqlplus locally on the server everything worked perfectly, sysdate, current_timestamp and systimestamp all returned the correct times with GMT. In SQL developer, however, even when running from the same timezone (GMT) the result of sysdate and systimestamp were still eastern time and not the GMT (current_timestamp returned the correct time).

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Oracle 12.2 Sharding Option

Lately I wrote a post about 12.2 new features. In the post I didn’t list sharding (probably one of the biggest features in this version), as I wanted to dedicate an entire post for it. In this post I will cover this option , but please note, as 12.2 is only released for the cloud and no one can install it and play with it, all the information is based on presentations I’ve seen at OOW and a chat I had with one of the developers in the demo ground. There might be some inaccuracies or mistakes in the post.

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Bash for DBAs – Part 1

Many Oracle databases are running on Linux/UNIX systems, and many DBAs need to write all kind of scripts. Over the years I’ve written probably tens of thousands of script lines (the longest script I remember was about 3000 lines), and almost every time I had the chance to learn something new. Bash is really really sophisticated and complex. One thing I will never forget is a sysadmin at one of my customers who taught me something new. When I asked him how he knows all of this bash stuff, he simply pointed at a book and said “read this and you’ll know everything as well”. It was a book containing the entire bash manual (the same as running “man bash”), and it was much larger than I would have expected. I have to admit that I haven’t read the entire manual yet…

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Using Different Languages in Oracle – Part 1

Being in North America (the English speaking side), made me understand that many people are not aware (and don’t actually care) about character sets too much. Everything supports English, and everything works. Coming from Israel, I realized that some of the language issues we have in computerized systems are less understood in the western world. For example, we write from right to left (we are not the only ones, Arabic is the same for example), and I always get strange looks when I sign a piece of paper. Another example is the completely different letters (unlike English and most European languages), and more. But we are not the only ones, many countries must have these difficulties, so I decided to write this post.

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